6 Steps to a Successful Integrated Marketing Strategy

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6 Steps to a Successful Integrated Marketing Strategy

By Justin Honaman - 03/14/2014
Retail marketers recognize that to increase brand equity, shoppers must be led along a path to purchase that results in more than just a product purchase, but also advocacy for the retail brand. Integrated Marketing strategy plays an important role in delivering the right brand message, to the right shopper, at the right time, via the right interaction channel to assist in a purchase decision or build brand awareness. This strategy requires evaluation and investment in multiple channels, including traditional, social, mobile, web/e-commerce and in-store.
 
Integrated marketing is about combining multiple marketing elements together to achieve an objective more efficiently and effectively than by implementing any one element alone. Several thoughts to consider when considering a successful integrated marketing campaign:
 
  1. Clearly define your target audience. A good campaign begins with a segmented list. Those segments are defined by attributes that tie to a product or service for which the campaign is centered. Start by defining the target list, identifying channels/outlets for the campaign, specific offers/treatments for each campaign and metrics to evaluate campaign performance. If the target audience cannot be clearly defined, it is unlikely that the campaign will be successful. Begin with the end in mind – who is your target shopper and through which channels do they shop your aisles, shelves or pages?
  1. Define measurable campaign objectives. Without measurable objectives, it will be challenging to measure ROI or net benefit of a campaign on product/service sales, sentiment or engagement. Many marketers get hung up in the content and creative of a campaign and lose site of the original campaign objectives and execution priorities. It's important to define and communicate objectives and to build insights from past campaigns into the planning process for future campaigns thereby shaping and sharpening objectives. From a mobile perspective, one of the main reasons that retail marketers spend on mobile has traditionally lagged is because of the lack of measurement, but marketers are increasingly interested in mobile since it is how shoppers are managing and planning shopping trips.
  1. Create clear, consistent and compelling content. Because it can take more than five impressions for an individual to recognize a brand or specific marketing message, follow the three "C's" for marketing messages. Communications must be clear, compelling and consistent. As a starting point for your content strategy, it is important to assess how well your content aligns with the behaviors and attitudes of your target consumer. Also, it can be useful to review your competitor's content strategy to determine if any gaps exist between your current content and the ideal set of content needed to become a credible brand with consumers.
  1. "Channel" your messaging. Some shoppers are on Facebook. Some shoppers are on Twitter. Some shoppers shop online and avoid the brick-and-mortar store. Some only shop the physical store. Some shoppers only shop your outlet store. Some shoppers buy your products through a third-party retailer or online outlet. Effective integrated marketing campaigns span retail touchpoints and deliver a customized, yet brand consistent, message and offer to shoppers. When marketing to shoppers across channels, it is imperative that the retailer set a consistent or brand-specific visual identity – an overarching look and feel, photography and graphic style, logo treatment and colors/fonts. Visual curation is a must and should be "Integrated Marketing 101" for your marketing team.
  1. Drive campaign decisions based on analytics. Integrated analytics are changing the way brand marketers think about integrated marketing. As is typical in retail, organizational silos limit coordination of brand-based integrated marketing campaigns. In fact, for many retail organizations, individual brands have their own budgets, work with their own agencies, collect and manage their own consumer data, and drive consumer interactions solely focused on their brand proposition. Integrated analytics are changing this as the concept of integrated shopper data reduces overall organizational marketing spend for data. Also, improved insights and analysis tools provide cross-brand views of shopper behavior and activity enabling new and different, dynamic marketing decisions while establishing a consistent brand experience for the shopper.
  1. Start with "WHY" when considering a loyalty program. Traditionally, retail marketers had few options when it came to impacting purchase behavior other than relying on costly in-store displays, extending a direct mail campaign, and/or buying spots in traditional media outlets to grab shoppers' attention. Retailers also regularly purchased shopper data to understand what's happening in store. Data latency, lack of cleanliness and harmonization issues make it difficult for marketers to know which levers they can pull to get more of their brands into the shopping basket at checkout.
 
Justin Honaman is a partner – consumer goods and retail for Teradata, a provider of enterprise analytic technologies and services that include data warehousing, business intelligence, CRM and more.